Sunday, October 2, 2011

Silver Spoon


Photo from Tess Kincaid for Magpie Tale #85

Don’t ask why
the elephants fly,
shorebirds die,
children cry
to see such blood on the moon
melt the silver spoon.

Merry more
in the eagle wars,
open sores,
closing doors;
Old King Cole searching his souls,
fiddles with the polls.

Ding, dong, bell
oil is in the well
more to sell,
men to fell,
and they all go marching down -
to the ground boom … boom



Posted for

34 comments:

  1. I like how you collage nursery rhyme lines and stark, intrusive contemporary images. The second verse particularly strikes me, with all the associations for Old King Cole (from Nero to the chad wars), the horror of open sores, and nobility of eagles.

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  2. clever use of the form of a nusery rhyme to drive the message home that bit harder - love it

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  3. This elephant is a runaway success story!! The politics makes it very interesting!!

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  4. I can add little to Kathy's and Jo's comment. Good writing.

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  5. good exercise- rhyme and rhythm, thanks.

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  6. I love how you put the nursery rhyme into that....great!

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  7. I lovd the way that you put the words from the nursery rhyme in to the poem....great!

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  8. Wonderful rhythm - serious undertones to a light-hearted veneer.

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  9. A spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down ...

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  10. boom...boom...boom...what king would meddle with the polls...oh ho ho ho...three blind mice and a farmers wife...

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  11. Haunting little nursery rhyme. I can imagine children singing this.

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  12. Powerful last paragraph -- thanks for this.

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  13. Oh but I so wanted to say "hell"-o...

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  14. Very intense and a masterful skewing of the old rhymes and their patina of innocence to the harsher realities that beset us-- I so appreciate your reading of my work, Ann. xxxj

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  15. Doom and gloom nursery rhymes? The kids will love 'em! :)

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  16. Surreal and ominous, and those chopped up nursery rhymes, they feel so dark -its like a macarbre skipping song. loved it

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  17. This is one that leaves me wishing that I had written it. Congratulations.

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  18. was here before but will say hiand great to see you at dverse....

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  19. Oh this one was great, really filled my rhyming plate. Darker rhymes can be such fun times, loved it!

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  20. A dark nursery rhyme in my favorite short form, each one masterly, Ann. I especially like the way they fit together and stand separately as well. The middle one is as chilling as it gets. Excellent work here.

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  21. to get out
    of the rain...boom, boom, boom! The march of ants for some reason strikes me as being a little bit more manageable! Had some fun with this one, thanks

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  22. Love the intensity, the build from nursery rhyme to... dark realities.

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  23. And Jack is rolling down that hill... Wow, that is some nursery rhyme-- and in a form you know I love. :) Excellent.

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  24. Mantled in mirth and fairy dust
    this piece morphs our smiles
    into one tight line as the truth
    of our plight on this planet
    thrusts home, to our hearts,
    adding another color to our
    aura, blood red.

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  25. Bleak and dark and the nursery rhyme intrusions provide an extra ominous touch. Well done!
    Mine was very much in the same vein.

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  26. The nursery rhymes combined with the repetitiona nd poetic lines - well done, Ann.

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  27. Great play on a nursery rhyme bringing the true sadness of life..... perfect syllabic meter, very hard to do and you pulled it off so well, leaving the subject of the poem the focus and not the form itself..... incredibly talented I think.... I particularity like your last stanza because it brings visions of wars we are currently fighting that hurts my soul....

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  28. The politics and poetry are superb.

    Anna :o

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  29. Thank you enormously to all who have read this poem, which really just flowed from the phrase "Don't ask why", a three word introduction required by the shadorma form. I am always afraid to overuse this form, although I love it for its' seeming ability to peel away layers hiding a kernel of truth, albeit behind the sheer veil without which life would simply bore us to our deaths.

    I have no idea how Tess chooses her prompts but I am grateful for them. I detested this photo and had decided not to write; I've done that before...and come up with something that surprised me. The process is fascinating ...mostly because I don't understand it. I marvel at the layers and layers of ideas swirling around in our heads and how they choose their dance partners … and the edges they dance to.

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