Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Cruising the Decades


Photo provided by Tess Kincaid
for Magpie Tales #79
















Why did we need a rumble seat, anyway?
It was a 1937 Ford Coupe, I think -
but there’s no one left alive to ask today.

It was already older than me when I was eight;
The year that I was born was a missing link.
Why did we need a rumble seat, anyway?

No cars were built in 1944 - a year’s delay
before the World War ended - on the brink -
but there’s no one left alive to ask today.

I was an only child, by the way,
afraid and shy with heart so quick to sink -
Why did we need a rumble seat, anyway?

Under the staircase where I’d hide or play,
I wondered why the thunder made me shrink -
but there’s no one left alive to ask today.

Yet life’s a tumbling box on every day
wearing down and polishing my chinks.
Why do we need this rumble seat, anyway -
but there’s no one left alive who’ll ever say.


Posted for
&
Open Mike Night
at



19 comments:

  1. I like the rhythm and the truth of this poem. It is sad when our questions must remain unanswered because 'there's no one left alive to ask today.'

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  2. A beautiful response to the prompt-- and a gorgeous villanelle. I also thought of the car as a Plymouth Dodge Coupe although I chopped a great deal out my draft-- and felt that the photo was somewhat ghostly-- love the idea of the child made to shrink by the thunder-- it pierces, that image. xxxj

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  3. Pretty interesting ..."but there’s no one left alive to ask today"

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  4. Lovely poem, almost song-like with its refrain.
    A memory can be so bittersweet...
    My poem was rather gloomy too.

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  5. Might be someone left alive, they may just not remember..haha. Great piece, love the pace and touch of playfulness thrown in.

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  6. that line is a breath stealer...thunder making you shrink is familiar as well...and a nice capture...nice form too...smiles.

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  7. A lovely write! Sentimental but also layered with depth,the emotion of the memory, the sadness that tends to come with time passing. Wonderful!

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  8. Excellent villanelle, Ann, with a haunting refrain couplet well used. The sense of the identity of the narrator is strongly defined, yet still leaves all the spaces open for the reader's imagination to provide answers.

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  9. Beautifully composed .... highlighting the importance of keeping our stories/memories alive for future generations.

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  10. i became lost in this hypnotic poem - the revision and the questions we all have - loved your construction and its contents -delivered a real place to my imagination - smart communication of a concept

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  11. "afraid and shy with a heart so quick to sink." What a line. I felt that one.

    Great write.

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  12. This is nice, it makes me think of all the unanswered questions that I have.

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  13. The poem fits the form like a glove fits a hand...

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  14. A well-crafted poem. Truly a delightful read.

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  15. thats wonderful, and the refrain is so sad.
    I'm in awe of your villanelle :)

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  16. This is beautiful, nostalgic... I can hear it as a song.

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  17. Villanelles are tricky, but so much fun to write...nice job, Ann.

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  18. Reading this poem a bit late, but just want to say there are so many things I would like to know now from people who aren't alive to say. Sad, isn't it, that we will never know! I'm following your blog now and enjoying it!

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